Case Study: Professional Orchestra Player


Posted on March 15th, 2012 by Kristin Thomson in Financial Case Studies, Participant Data. 3 Comments

Previous: Gross Income

This page provides a detailed look at the Artist’s gross income for each year from 2007-2011.

Gross Revenue, 2007

 

 

In 2006, the artist was hired as a section player in a professional orchestra. His income in 2007 reflects this, with 72 percent being derived from this salaried position. He also continued to do some freelance work with smaller orchestras, ensembles and chamber music groups, which accounted for 24 percent of his income. Two percent of his income came from teaching private lessons to a handful of students.

Revenue Category

2007

Details

Salary: orchestra 73.2% Salaried position with an orchestra. Payment includes rehearsals and performances
Freelance: live 24.5% Payments for specific performances with a variety of ensembles, orchestras and chamber groups. Also a few club gigs and weddings
Teaching 2.3% Private lessons
Gross Revenue, 2008

 

In 2008, the artist ended his salaried position with one major orchestra, and he began auditioning for others. He continued to perform, touring Europe with a number of groups and freelancing with other professional orchestras. He also earned some radio royalties, which were passed through to him from the orchestra he was part of from 2006-2008.

Revenue Category

2008

Details

Freelance: live 61.4% Payments for specific performances with a variety of ensembles, orchestras and chamber groups. Also a few club gigs and weddings.
Salary: orchestra 35.5% Salaried position with an orchestra. Payment includes rehearsals and performances.
Radio royalties 2.9% From performances with orchestra.
Freelance: studio 0.2% Payments for studio session work.
Gross Revenue, 2009

 

In 2009, the artist was hired as a section player in one of the top orchestras in the country. As a result, the majority of his income – 74 percent – was derived from this salaried position. He continued with some freelance live performances with regional orchestras and ensembles. He also did some freelance studio work, contributing to an artist’s recording session and, separately, to some recordings for film and TV. In each case, he was paid for his time and skill; he did not receive any composition credits or any points on future record sales or synchronizations.

Revenue Category

2009

Details

Salary: orchestra 74.9% Salaried position with an orchestra. Payment includes rehearsals and performances.
Freelance: live 17.9% Payments for specific performances with a variety of ensembles, orchestras and chamber groups. Also a few club gigs and weddings.
Freelance: studio 7.1% Payments for in-studio performances for other artists’ sound recordings or soundtracks.
Gross Revenue, 2010

 

The artist’s income in 2010 continued to reflect his position as a full time salaried player. His freelance gigs with non-full time orchestras and ensembles also continued, but made up a much smaller piece of his annual revenue. The remainder of his income in 2010 came from a bit of work in the studio, and from teaching private lessons to two students.

Revenue Category

2010

Details

Salary: orchestra 86.4% Salaried position with an orchestra. Payment includes rehearsals and performances.
Freelance: live 9.1% Payments for specific performances with a variety of ensembles, orchestras and chamber groups. Also a few club gigs and weddings.
Teaching 2.9% Private lessons
Freelance: studio 1.2% Payments for in-studio performances for other artists’ sound recordings or soundtracks.
Honoraria 0.3% Payments for master classes and in-school performances
AFM + AFTRA IP Fund 0.1% Distributes money to non-featured musicians (including orchestra players) based on royalties accrued in foreign territories
Gross Revenue, 2011

 

The artist’s income in 2011 continued to be dominated by his role as a salaried player. This was supplemented by a handful of freelance gigs – both live and in the studio – and some residual royalties paid through the AFM + AFTRA Intellectual Property Fund.

Revenue Category

2011

Details

Salary: orchestra 86.3% Salaried position with an orchestra. Payment includes rehearsals and performances.
Freelance: live 4.9% Payments for specific performances with a variety of ensembles, orchestras and chamber groups. Also a few club gigs and weddings.
Teaching 4.0% Private lessons
AFM + AFTRA IP Fund 3.7% Distributes money to non-featured musicians (including orchestra players) based on royalties accrued in foreign territories
Freelance: studio 0.8% Payments for in-studio performances for other artists’ sound recordings or soundtracks.
Honoraria 0.3% Payments for master classes and in-school performances

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About the Case Studies

Graphs do not have a Y-axis dollar value in order to observe the conditions of our privacy policy. In addition, graphs and visuals in case studies are not comparable within or between case studies. For more details about this, read about our financial case study protocol.

Information detailed in case studies is based on data received directly from the artist or their authorized representative. The data analysis and lessons learned here are based on individual experience, and do not necessarily reflect the experiences of all musicians in genre or roles.

Case studies are one of three ways this project is looking at music creator income.




3 responses to “Case Study: Professional Orchestra Player”

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