Does Radio Airplay Matter?


Posted on May 7th, 2012 by Kristin Thomson in What We're Learning. 5 Comments

Radio contributes to an artist’s brand

A number of the interviewees stated that, in the most basic sense, radio airplay helps build and expand music fan’s awareness of an artist’s brand.

I think that anything that builds awareness of an artist’s music and their brand will lead to people being more likely to buy a ticket or buy a record or download music.
  – Classical Manager A

I think it contributes to the brand. Especially like European sales. I could go to Europe and I could tour clubs as my own name and I could draw some people just based on what I see in the airplay that I get in different countries.
– Wayne Kramer, composer/indie artist

It’s interesting; we’ve seen over the years that in terms of actual sales we don’t see any direct correlation any more with radio play versus creating revenue. It seems to me that it helps more with brand recognition. Just the sort of thing where people have heard of you and sometimes it can translate into making for better shows, particularly if you are working alongside the radio
– Tom, Indie Artist and Label Owner

…but radio is just part of the strategy.

Interviewees were also cautious about putting too much of their faith in the perceived power of radio.

I wouldn’t ever consider it a negative. We like every bit of exposure we can have. I would just say that it’s a more minor impact on people learning about the band than some other things that we do.
– Big Band Manager

If we’re on All Things Considered do we see a bump in ticket sales? Not really. I think it’s more subtle than that.  How do you remain top of mind with your patrons or your perspective patrons? Whether we’re on NPR or whether it’s our regular [radio] broadcast, whether it’s our television series, all those things contribute to that.
– Symphony Orchestra Manager

Next: Radio’s perceived impact, continued





5 responses to “Does Radio Airplay Matter?”

  1. […] extent. Our artist revenue streams study found that significant commercial radio airplay remains out of reach for all but a tiny handful of artists.  And our earlier radio-centric research demonstrates that […]

  2. […] extent. Our artist revenue streams study found that significant commercial radio airplay remains out of reach for all but a tiny handful of artists.  And our earlier radio-centric research demonstrates that […]

  3. […] extent. Our artist revenue streams study found that significant commercial radio airplay remains out of reach for all but a tiny handful of artists.  And our earlier radio-centric research demonstrates that […]

  4. […] extent. Our artist revenue streams study found that significant commercial radio airplay remains out of reach for all but a tiny handful of artists.  And our earlier radio-centric research demonstrates that […]

  5. […] of music, from live performances to digital video (especially in the noncommercial sector, as a recent Future of Music study illustrates). The presentation suggests that there are new ways for radio to expand into both […]