Does organizational membership matter?


Posted on September 5th, 2013 by Kristin Thomson in What We're Learning. 1 Comment

Membership and estimated music income

On the survey there were a number of questions about time, income and sources of revenue. By multiplying a respondent’s personal gross income by the percent of income derived from music, we were able to generate a gross estimated music income (EMI) for each of the 5,371 survey participants.

For all respondents (N=5,371), the average gross estimated music income (EMI) was $34,455.  But as the charts below indicate, the EMI for respondents who were a member of a PRO was $42,041, while the EMI of respondents who were not a member of a PRO was $30,326. In other words, respondents who were members of ASCAP, BMI, SESAC or a foreign PRO were earning nearly $12,000 more in gross estimated music income annually than those who were not a member of any PRO.

membershipPROEMI.006

In order to ensure these income numbers aren’t simply a reflection of the differences between full-time workers and part-time workers, let’s look at the calculated hourly wages of these different groups.

Composer PRO respondents      $27.61

Calc NoPRO respondents             $22.44

The calculated hourly wage suggests that – on an hourly basis – those respondents who were members of ASCAP, BMI, SESAC or a foreign PRO were making more money than those who do not belong to a PRO.

Let’s do the same analysis on members of music-focused organizations. Similarly, the EMI of respondents who were members of any music organization was $43,190, more than twice that of respondents who were not a member of any organization.

membershiporgEMI.007

The hourly wages calculation supports this finding:

Any Music Org respondents          $28.91

No Music Org respondents             $14.26

Again, the calculated hourly wage suggests that – on an hourly basis – those respondents who were members of any organizations were making twice as much as those who did not belong to any organizations.

Drilling down into specific music organizations, the differences in estimated music income hold; in all cases, respondents who were members of these key organizations had higher EMIs than the general survey population.membershiporgEMIdetail.08

Next: membership and sources of revenue






One response to “Does organizational membership matter?”

  1. […] Does organisational membership matter? This material was first presented at Music: Parts and Labor conference at New York University in April 2012 and examines the relationship between organisational membership and income. […]